I Need Help

Contact

  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).

    • The Lifeline staff are trained counselors that can refer you to resources in your community.

    • The Lifeline is available 24/7

    • It's free and confidential

  • A mental health professional

  • A hospital emergency department

  • To find support outside the U.S., go to Befrienders Worldwide. If you have a hard time making these contact, get someone to help you. Ask your parents or other adults for help. Or find help from people and organizations specialized in crisis intervention, mental health, or suicide prevention.

Do not keep suicidal thoughts to yourself!

Help is available for you, whether through a friend, parent, teacher, doctor, coach, counselor, therapist, or member of the clergy. Find someone you trust and let them know how bad things are. Keep telling someone until you get the help you need.

Important Facts we would like to share with you:

Suicidal thinking is usually associated with problems that can be treated.

Thoughts of suicide can be cause by emotional disorders. Sometimes they may get in the way of seeing other options. Most people who receive appropriate care improve or recover completely. Even if you have received treatment before, you should know that different treatments work better for different people in different situations. Several times are sometime necessary before the right treatment for you is found.

Others might see solutions

If you are unable to think of solutions other than suicide, it is not that solutions don't exists, only that you are currently unable to see them. A therapist or counselor, or sometimes a friend, can help you to see solutions to your problems, even if you think you've tried everything.

Suicidal crisis are almost always temporary

Although it might seem as if you will always feel this way, it is important to realize that crises are usually time-limited. Solutions are found, feelings change, unexpected positive events occur. Suicide is someone referred to as "a permanent solutions to a temporary problem." Don't let suicide rob you of better times in your future. There are many, many people who suffered feelings of despair and thoughts of suicide but made it through to a long and fulfilling life. Even celebrities, including J.K. Rowling, Billie Eilish, Drew Barrymore, Sophie Turner, and Eminem have experienced these emotions.

Problems are seldom as great as they appear at first

Family conflict, relationship issues, grades, peer pressure, and loss of important people in our lives - all such stressful events can seem catastrophic at the time they are happening. Then, months or years later, they are things of the past. Some of these challenges may even increase your resilience and resolve in life. If you imagine yourself five years down the road you may see that a problem that currently seems catastrophic will pass.

Reasons for living can help a person in pain

You may be able to find more reasons to live if you think about what has given your life meaning or what is important to you. Family ties, your religion, love of art or nature, and dreams for the future are just a few of the many things in our lives that provide meaning and gratification. It is sometimes difficult to recall these things during times of emotional distress. You may need help to explore and reconnect to your reasons for living, as well as help to successfully work through reasons that have contributed to your thoughts of dying.


My Child or Youth Needs Help

You may be concerned about your son or daughter, a student, or another youth. It is important that you recognize the warning signs and risk factors of suicide and know what to do, but first there are things you may want to know.

How could anyone want to die?

Many people are unable to see alternatives to their problems or an end to their pain. Many who consider dying by suicide still want to live: the youth you are concerned about may have mixed feelings about turning thoughts of suicide into a suicidal act. By recognizing his or her risk and getting him or her to help, a life can be saved.

Go ahead and ask.

A youth may hint or joke about suicide, but it is important to take all communications about suicide seriously. It is safe to ask directly, "Are you thinking about killing yourself?" Talking about suicide does not cause suicide. If you have difficulty asking the youth about his or her thoughts, enlist another adult to help you. Or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255) and the trained counselors there will help.

Really Listen.

Show your interest and support without judgement. Don't interrupt, and don't give advice. Express concern and tell the youth that together you will find help.

Stay with the youth.

Don't leave a suicidal youth alone. Go with him or her to a mental health professional, hospital emergency room, or his or her primary care physician.

Move lethal means out of harm's way.

If there are firearms, drugs, or other means of suicide in the home, remove them until the crisis has passed. Make anything inaccessible that might be used by the youth in an impulsive moment.

Suicide Prevention Resources for Parents/Guardians/Families

A list of websites and other online information that have prevention resources for parents, guardians, and other family members.

Preventing Suicide: A Tool-Kit for High Schools

Assists high schools and school districts in designing and implementing strategies to prevent suicide and promote behavioral health. Includes tools to implement a multi-faceted suicide prevention program that responds to the needs and cultures of students.

Safe and Effective Messaging for Suicide Prevention

This document offers evidence-based recommendations for creating safe and effective messages to raise public awareness that suicide is a serious and preventable public health problem.

The Role of High School Mental Health Providers in Preventing Suicide

This information sheet is for mental health staff that the school has designated as being responsible for handling student mental health crisis.

The Role of High School Teachers in Preventing Suicide

An information sheet that helps teachers understand why suicide prevention fits their role as a teacher.

My Friend Needs Help

Learn the warning signs and what to do.

Among young people, friends sometimes let friends know if they are thinking about suicide or dying. Other times, they don't say anything, but their behavior communicates that they are struggling emotionally. Any of the following warning signs and risk factors should prompt you to express concern, ask about suicidal thoughts and plans, and help your friend get help.

How could anyone want to die?

Many people are unable to see alternatives to their problems or an end to their pain. Many who consider dying by suicide still want to live: your friend may have mixed feelings about acting on their thoughts of suicide. By recognizing his or her risk and getting him or her to help, a life can be saved.

Go ahead and ask.

Your friend may hint or joke about suicide, but it is important to take all communications about suicide seriously. It is safe to ask directly "Are you thinking about killing yourself?" Talking about suicide does not cause suicide. If you have difficulty asking the youth about his or her thoughts, enlist an adult to help you. Or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255) and the trained counselors there will help you.

Don't keep secrets.

Rather than promising your friend to keep their thoughts of suicide a secret, tell him or her you can help, but you need to involve other people. True friends will remain your friend, even if he or she does not initially agree with your approach or help-seeking. Your efforts to help another will not be overlooked. Keeping secrets about suicide can have devastating consequences that could affect you for a long time.

Really Listen.

Show your interest and support without judgement. Don't interrupt, and don't give advice. Express concern and tell your friend that you will get him/her help together. Simply showing a friend that you care enough to listen can be lifesaving.

Stay with your friend.

Don't leave a suicidal friend alone. Go with him or her to a mental health professional, hospital emergency room, or his or her doctor.

Move out of harm's way.

If there are firearms, drugs, or other means of suicide in his or her house, remove them until the crisis has passed. Make anything inaccessible that might be used by your friend in an impulsive moment.

Take care of yourself.

Helping a suicidal friend is stressful. Make sure you get support. Talk to a friend or family member and get good food, rest, exercise and whatever else you need.